Diggin' up Dead People

A Genealogy Blog

Week 29: Musical: Sebastian Baechle

on July 17, 2015

This week’s theme in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Week’s Challenge is musical.  Since I have no known direct line ancestors that were singers, musicians, etc, I decided to go with a name that reminds me of someone musical.  So, although I have no known connection to Johann Sebastian Bach, I do have a Sebastian Baechle in my line!

Like the famous Sebastian born in 1685, my Sebastian was born in Germany, albeit about a century later.  Sebastian Baechle is first found in records of German Marriages.  Married to Caecilia Hoch at Forbach, Baden in 1809, Sebastian was likely born about 1780-1790. (Caecilia Hoch may be the same Maria Caecilia Hoch born at Forbach in 1789)

How I have traced back to Sebastian:

William Merkel, (born in 1857), married Magdalena Maier.  He provided the names of his parents: Egidius Merkel and Mary Goetz.  These names are supported also by the Germay birth record database.

In the database of selected German marriages, the record for Egid Merkel and Maria Anna Goetz provides his birthdate (1835) and parents Florian Merkel and Rosalia Baech.  For the same birthdate, in the Germany birth record database, a record has been found for Egidius Merkel born to Florian Merkel and Rosalia Baechle.

Rosalia Baechle’s marriage record to Florian Merkel gives her parents as Sebastian Baechle and Maria Zaezilia Hoch.  Though that record did not give Rosalie’s birth date, the marriage took place in 1833.  A birth and a baptism record for Rosalie Baechle shows she was born in 1810 to Sebastian Baechle and Caecilia Hoch.  This makes sense, she would have been 23 at the time of her marriage.

Birth records have been found for 5 children born to Sebastian and Caecilia: Rosalia, Carolus, Johann Beata, Walburga and Josephus.  While the first four were all born between 1810 and 1815, Josephus was not born until 9 years later in 1824.  The large gap in dates suggests that more children may have been perhaps miscarried, stillborn or the possibility of other unrecorded or unindexed births.  This, as well as the parents of Sebastian are areas I would like to research further.


I’ve relied heavily on these sources for my German research.  They are index sources (and in English!) to the original records that I hope to view in the future:

“Germany, Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898.” Index. FamilySearchhttp://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2013. Index based on data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah.

“Germany, Marriages, 1558-1929.” Index. FamilySearchhttp://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2015. Index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City.

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